Boulder Ballot Issue 1B: The Power of Compulsory Charity

THe October 10 post at the Foothills United Way blog states:

A penny helps a single mother get affordable child care, so she can work to support her family.

A penny helps an uninsured or under-insured family get access to the medical care they need.

A penny helps feed a family.

That penny is provided by Worthy Cause 1B – a .05 percent tax that equals one cent on each $20 purchase.

No.  That penny is provided by retailers, who get it from their customers.  The so-called “Worthy Cause 1B” is a law that makes it a crime for customers not to give this penny.  The so-called “Worthy Cause” tax provided government force, a threat, to all those who might choose to give their pennies to charitable organizations of their choosing, rather than to a charity that government officials prefer.

Boulder County Ballot Issue 1B is not about whether the causes are worthy.  It’s about using government to force your neighbors to donate to a cause that you deem as “worthy,” which means your neighbors have less money to donate to causes they think are worthy.  As I’ve written before, Ballot Issue 1B is intolerant, arrogant, and elitist.

This tax is sponsored by the so-called “Citizens for a Worthy Cause.”  These are not just ordinary citizens, but the very same non-profits that stand to benefit from the tax, at the expense of non-profits who refrain from using government to raise money.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under politics

2 responses to “Boulder Ballot Issue 1B: The Power of Compulsory Charity

  1. nub

    i can understand opposing this ballot issue on standard anti-tax grounds. i can understand calling it unfair, or even wrong. what i don’t understand is your use of the terms “intolerant, arrogant and elitist.” can you elaborate on what makes it any of those things? the previous post didn’t explain it either. it seems to me that you’ve just appropriated the incendiary buzzwords of the politically correct left (“intolerant”) and culture warrior right (“arrogant and elitist”) and applied them in a context where they don’t really belong.

    Brian replies:
    OK, you might have me on “arrogant.” People might support mandatory charity out of arrogance, but certainly it’s not essential. I find mandatory charity intolerant to other people’s views of what is a worthy cause to them, and how they use the money they earn to express their own values. Also, having the political class decide what is a worthy cause by spending other people’s money by force strikes me as elitist.

  2. nub

    i can understand opposing this ballot issue on standard anti-tax grounds. i can understand calling it unfair, or even wrong. what i don’t understand is your use of the terms “intolerant, arrogant and elitist.” can you elaborate on what makes it any of those things? the previous post didn’t explain it either. it seems to me that you’ve just appropriated the incendiary buzzwords of the politically correct left (“intolerant”) and culture warrior right (“arrogant and elitist”) and applied them in a context where they don’t really belong.

    Brian replies:
    OK, you might have me on “arrogant.” People might support mandatory charity out of arrogance, but certainly it’s not essential. I find mandatory charity intolerant to other people’s views of what is a worthy cause to them, and how they use the money they earn to express their own values. Also, having the political class decide what is a worthy cause by spending other people’s money by force strikes me as elitist.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s